The Davis Community’s New Fitness Center!

When it comes to senior rehabilitation, the term, “strength training,” may seem out of place. Studies show us that in order for seniors to enjoy optimum health and faster healing times, strength training needs to be an active component in their rehabilitation or exercise regimen.

At Davis Community’s new fitness center, we make strength training an essential part of our senior rehabilitation in Wilmington NC. Seniors who regularly exercise at The Fitness Center enjoy a higher quality of life, more flexibility and mobility, and improved health. In this month’s blog post we take a look at how strength training benefits seniors and we offer up some easy exercises to add to your routine.

How Can Strength Training Help Seniors?

Strength training exercises are specially-designed to help improve one’s overall physical strength. More accurately, these exercises help increase muscle mass and bone density so the body’s entire musculoskeletal system can be fortified. Seniors can benefit greatly from strength training because so many of their most common ailments are related to the musculoskeletal system, such as osteoporosis, arthritis, and degenerative back disease.

When a senior suffers from musculoskeletal degeneration, they will be more apt to suffer from loss of balance, and this is one of the most common reasons why seniors suffer from broken bones and other injuries. Plus, by adding strength training to a senior’s exercise regimen, the risks of developing Type II Diabetes, obesity, and pulmonary disease can also be significantly reduced.

Strength Training Exercises for Seniors

Senior strength training is different from traditional strength training because it doesn’t involve lifting heavy weights or other potentially dangerous exercises. The two most common types of exercises used to help increase muscle and bone strength in seniors are isometric exercises and progressive resistance exercises. Here are a few examples of each.

Isometric Exercises

Isometric exercises are great for seniors because these exercises do not require movement. An example of this type of exercise is to lie on your back with one leg raised. Keeping the leg straight, have a trainer hold your foot so you can’t lower your leg. Tense your muscles as if you are lowering your leg. With this type of exercises, your muscle is being strengthened without relying on your joints.

Progressive Resistance Exercises

Progressive resistance exercises are for taking your strength conditioning to the next level. These exercises involve using free weights, resistance bands, or exercise equipment. These exercises should only be practiced after building up to them via the isometric exercises, or if approved by your doctor.

For seniors, it is important to know how much exercise is beneficial and how much exercise will increase the risk of injury. That’s why Davis Community’s new fitness center employs personal trainers who are highly experienced in working with seniors. Our trainers can develop a safe and effective strength training program especially for your fitness level and need.

Visit Davis’ Fitness Center for Expert Rehabilitation in Wilmington NC

Davis Community opened its new Fitness Center and since that time our residents have enjoyed faster recoveries from surgical procedures and an overall improvement in their mental and physical wellness. Our exercise pavilion is equipped with state-of-the-art exercise and media equipment and our professional staff highly experienced in their crafts, which include acupuncture, massage therapy, personal training, and more. From the healing arts to senior strength training, the Davis Community fitness center offers everything you need for effective rehabilitation in Wilmington NC.

If you have any questions or you would like more information about the Fitness Center at The Davis Community, please give us a call at (910) 566-1200 today.

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